Anthosachne scabra - Native Wheat grass

$83.00$165.00 (GST Inc.)

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SKU *Anth.scabra Categories ,

Description

Native Wheat grass is found in all Australian states except the Northern Territory and is more common in districts with cool winters. In mature stands, wheat grass often forms only a small percentage of the sward probably owing to its high palatability at certain times of the year. Habitats where it can be found are plains grasslands, redgum woodland, and dry sclerophyll forests.

Native Wheat grass is an all year green perennial grass with a tussocky habit. The leaves are narrow, rough along the edges and have a half-twist. It grows from 30 to 100 cm high and flowers from late spring to summer. The seedheads are quite long (up to 1.5 m) and can become lax and fall over. Seeds have one long awn per seed, but often remain joined together as a group even when they have dropped from the stem. The plant remains green throughout the summer as long as there is some soil moisture.

SOILS

Native Wheat grass is found on various soil types from sand to clay-loams. It has a wide range of tolerances from mildly acidic to alkaline soils.

USES

An attractive, useful grass for both pasture and revegetation. Revegetation is one of the best uses because Wheat grass establishes rapidly and has high seedling vigour. This native pasture grass is incredibly versatile. Many customers have been successfully using the Native Wheat grass as a cover crop to accompany a slower growing grass such as Wallaby grass.

Pasture –it occurs naturally with other grasses and is one of the first to start growing in spring, providing early green feed. It has high to moderate feed value. It is drought resistant, frost tolerant and has strong winter and early spring growth. Native Wheat grass is best used for revegetation or pasture. Native Wheat grass is easier to establish than many other native grass species. The seedheads should be clipped into individual florets, each containing one seed. Preferred depth for sowing is around 10 mm in autumn to winter. With moist conditions, the seed takes from seven to ten days to germinate. The seedlings are hairy and bluish in colour. They progress rapidly through to the five to seven leaf stage.

 

TOLERANCES
  • High frost tolerance
  • Moderate drought tolerance
  • Low salt tolerance
  • High heat tolerance

Unfortunately due to quarantine restrictions this product is not available to Western Australia

Additional Grass Information

SCIENTIFIC NAME

Elymus scaber, formally Anthosachne scabra

SOILS

Native Wheat grass is found on various soil types from sand to clay-loams. It has a wide range of tolerances from mildly acidic to alkaline soils.

TOLERANCES

  • High frost tolerance
  • Moderate drought tolerance
  • Low salt tolerance
  • High heat tolerance

USES

An attractive, useful grass for both pasture and revegetation. Revegetation is one of the best uses because Wheat grass establishes rapidly and has high seedling vigour. It can be used successfully as a cover crop to accompany a slower growing grass such as Wallaby grass.

Pasture –it occurs naturally with other grasses and is one of the first to start growing in spring, providing early green feed. It has high to moderate feed value.

Native Wheat grass was developed by Dr Michelle Murphy while studying at the University of New England. It is drought resistant, frost tolerant and has strong winter and early spring growth. Native Wheat grass is best used for revegetation or pasture.

 

SOWING

SOW RATE
8-10kg per acre 20-25kg per ha

SOWING GUIDELINES

  1. For best results try to ensure that the seed bed is weed free. Native grasses are slow growers and effective weed control is highly desirable.
  2. It is also incredibly helpful to know the pH levels of your soil so take soil sample to test your soil pH level, following test kit instructions.
  3. While the soil is under preparation, it is a good idea to sow a few seeds into a sterile seed raising mix to be kept moist until germination. This will allow for easier identification of lawn seedlings once the lawn is sown.
  4. Before sowing, the soil surface should be loosened with either a rake or harrows to ensure adequate seed to soil contact.
  5. No fertiliser is necessary. in particular, avoid any phosphate-based fertilisers. The addition of organic matter however will add to a successful result.
  6. Spread the seed evenly over the prepared surface and rake it in, so it is lightly covered. Seed sown deeper than 15 mm may not germinate.
  7. Where possible, try rolling the area as it lightly presses soil particles together and ensures grass seeds are in contact with the soil. This will eliminate air pockets that could interfere with seed germination and growth and a rolled seedbed also holds moisture longer.
  8. If there is access to irrigation, for the first three weeks, water approximately 2-3 times a week, taking into account the weather. Where there is no access to irrigation, sow from autumn to spring coincided with rain. It is important after sowing grass seed to ensure seeds do not dry out.
  9. Use the sown seed sample to help identify grass seedlings from weeds.

BEST TIME TO SOW

Irrigation Sow all year round
No irrigation Sow from autumn to spring coincided with rain

Unfortunately due to Quarantine restrictions this product is not available to Western Australia

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